Eating Fast is an Addiction

The Weigh In

I was 199.7 today, 201.5 yesterday and 197.2 just four days ago. What happened? Well four days ago, I went to the rodeo/carnival. It was also the day my folks left after visiting for two weeks. We wound up missing the rodeo because it sold out, so I sorta drowned my sorrows in food.

Food is a Drug Too

What I’ve noticed over these past few months is that food and eating fast is pretty much an addiction. Once you fall off the wagon of One Minute Bite and go back to eating way too much, way too fast, it’s hard to get back in line. I noticed that after gaining four pounds on Saturday, it was hard to get back to One Minute Bite come Sunday. Then today, it was easy to stay in line, but in between meals my body was craving/yearning to be stuffed again like it was on Saturday.

I know for many hugely obese people, food is an addiction. However, I didn’t think it was hugely obese at 250. Maybe I was though. Maybe I was slowly on my way to becoming 300 then 350. I can’t honestly say whether I was or wasn’t. To be honest, that in and of itself is pretty scary.

What’s so Addicting about Food/Eating?

To be honest, I’m not entirely sure. For me, there’s something about feeling immensely stuffed. While being super stuffed isn’t good, there’s something about coming down from the bursting point. I think it helps me feel more satisfied because it’s much more noticeable in between meals. You feel fuller after the meal and you definitely feel hungrier before the next meal. The sad thing is though, that its not healthy and it’s a vicious cycle.

As you get bigger, it’s harder and harder to feel that stuffed without eating more and more food. This means it’s harder to have that experience of going from full to hungry. As you get bigger, you start to care less and less about how you look. You start to think things like, “Well, I’m already fat so why does it matter how much I eat?”

Over-eating, or eating too fast, is probably more a reflection of our self-confidence then we’d like to admit. I’m not saying every skinny person is confident or anything like that. I’m just saying that I bet most people are healthy and in decent shape, probably love themselves more than people who are unhealthy and not in shape. I don’t think it’s necessarily a conscience thing either. We each have our hidden secrets that we don’t like about ourselves. We have things we constantly beat ourselves up with that no one knows about.

In order to be successful with One Minute Bite, it’s necessary to find out some of those things and correct them. It’ll be hard to do, but it’ll make doing the diet plan that much easier. I know when I mentally tell myself, “You’re so stupid for doing…” I find myself eating more food and eating it quicker. Usually though, if I take a look back a few days later I’ll see that it wasn’t all that bad. In fact, I wind up doing more damage to myself by over-eating than I do by making whatever mistake I was beating myself over.

We’re human. We make mistakes. We’re not perfect. We deserve happiness and we need to be healthy to properly enjoy it.

About Tom

I'm the founder of the One Minute Bite. I'm fat, but I don't do anything extreme that should make me fat...or so I thought. After taking a look at my habits and of those around me, I noticed something: Most people eat way too fast. I created One Minute Bite to help fight that. This website will track my progress as I put this diet plan to the test.

Comments

  1. Shalom Wagshul says:

    Hi there! Before coming to this website, I had stumbled across the same idea of waiting one minute in between bites. I’ve been doing it for a few days until now. It really works to curb your hunger!

    • I agree. It’s pretty amazing how it works. The hard part is finding the patience to maintain the slow pace of eating.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] 1)   Discomfort emotionally 2)   A lack of presence 3)   Being BUSY, not prioritizing eating as both a health practice and pleasure 4)   Fear (see all of the above) 5)   Overwhelmingly hungry because I waited too long since my last meal or snack 6)  (Not my personal experience), but one article I did find spoke about Addiction (read more on his opinion) [...]

  2. [...] 1)   Discomfort emotionally 2)   A lack of presence 3)   Being BUSY, not prioritizing eating as both a health practice and pleasure 4)   Fear (see all of the above) 5)   Overwhelmingly hungry because I waited too long since my last meal or snack 6)  (Not my personal experience), but one article I did find spoke about Addiction (read more on his opinion) [...]

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